Getting few hours of sleep affects cholesterol

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A recent survey conducted at the sleep laboratory of the University of Helsinki in Finland involving 2,739 individuals suggested that subjects who reported sleeping fewer hours had lower levels of high density lipoprotein, the so-called good cholesterol, than individuals who claimed to sleep more. On average, blood analysis of individuals reporting to sleep fewer hours showed values of these proteins that were on average 10 percent lower comparing to individuals who slept more hours. Also, the cholesterol-regulating genes were found to be less active in the analysis of individuals who slept more hours, compared to the ones claiming to sleep less.

As part of this research, a partial study was conducted involving 14 healthy adults who volunteered to sleep at the sleep laboratory for four hours a night during five days. Other group of six adults slept eight hours during five days. Like in the previous experience, the cholesterol-regulating genes were found to be less active in the analysis of individuals who slept more hours, compared to the ones claiming to sleep less. Bad cholesterol levels contribute to the risk of cardiovascular diseases, which together with other risk factors may prove to be very dangerous to health.

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